Arthur Robert Ashe Jr | 2nd Annual Digital Black History Month Education Campaign (Day VIII)

We are pleased to share day VIII of 540’s 2nd Annual Digital Black History Month Education Campaign

Arthur Ashe | Professional Tennis Player & Aids Activist

Who: Arthur Ashe
Date of Birth: July 10, 1943 – February 6, 1993
Place of Birth: Richmond, VA
Education: UCLA
Accomplishments:

  • Only African-American man to win Wimbledon and the U.S. and Australian Opens
  • First African-American member of the U.S. Davis Cup Team
  • Served 2 years in the U.S Army

In a time when segregation was still common place in Virginia, Arthur broke barriers and rose to high heights as a professional tennis player. Arthur Ashe was the first black player selected to the United States Davis Cup team and the only black man ever to win the singles title at Wimbledon, the US Open, and the Australian Open. He retired in 1980. He was ranked World No. 1 by Harry Hopman in 1968 and by Lance Tingay of The Daily Telegraph and World Tennis Magazine in 1975. In the ATP computer rankings, he peaked at No. 2 in May 1976.

In the early 1980s, Ashe is believed to have contracted HIV from a blood transfusion he received during heart bypass surgery. Ashe publicly announced his illness in April 1992 and began working to educate others about HIV and AIDS. He founded the Arthur Ashe Foundation for the Defeat of AIDS and the Arthur Ashe Institute for Urban Health before his death from AIDS-related pneumonia at age 49 on February 6, 1993.

“Arthur Ashe is the first African American to win the men’s singles at Wimbledon and the U.S. Open, and the first African-American man to be ranked No. 1 in the world”

About the Campaign

Every day throughout the month of February 540Blog will devote space to sharing Little Known Facts About Black Americans Throughout History. For us every month is Black History Month but we recognize and support the continuous need to take time and space to put a special spotlight on the accomplishments of Black and brown Americans from all ethnicities that have literally changed the course of history and yet have legacies that are not know by the masses.

Resources

  1. Wikipedia.org
  2. History.com
  3. Biography.com
Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: